Small towns and beaches

 

Tuesday, November 22, 2016
Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico

In an interesting change of roles, I have been the guest of Frida, a young woman who was my guest many years ago when she was only ten. Frida came to Canada to practise her English: she went to summer camp with my daughter, she caught poison ivy, she travelled out west by car with us; she marvelled at the “snow” when we crossed the glaciers between Jasper and Banff.

This past weekend, it was I who rode in the back of the van to Manzanillo. Frida and her husband, Ricardo, stopped in Comala on the way to have breakfast. We found a charming place on a side street, overlooking a lush ravine, which served some delicious Mexican breakfast dishes: chilaquiles, sopes, frijoles, fresh juices, and café, of course.

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On the beach in Manzanillo and in Malaque, we snacked on fresh pineapple, jícama, cucumber, and shrimp all laced with chile and lemon. We drank green coconut water and beer in the shade of big parasols and cooled off in the beautiful waters of the Pacific.

On the way back to Guadalajara, we stopped in Sayula, a pretty town which specializes in making knives, cajeta (dulce de leche), sweet pastries and empanadas, and birria. It is also the birthplace of the author and photographer, Juan Rulfo (1917-1986).

 

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Author: vjpro

I am a retired high school teacher from Canada who loves to travel, garden, bicycle, hike, sail, and cook. Since retiring, my ideal year is divided between travelling in the winter, usually solo, and spending the rest of the year in Canada with family and friends.

2 thoughts on “Small towns and beaches”

  1. Allo Valerie,
    Merci pour les oeuvres -sculptures si inspirantes d’Ismaël Vargas et la beauté de Guadalajara.
    J’apporte ces images pour mon vernissage ce soir pour mon exposition sur Autrement les mots ou j’exposerai Séisme rouge (Hommage aux femmes disparues dans le tremblement de terre en Haïti) et quelques gravures. Bonne continuité de voyage!
    A bientôt amiga, Marie Ginette

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