Home soon

Travelling is great, but I always miss being home, and the closer the time to return home, the more I look forward to seeing family and friends, enjoying the comforts of home, getting back into some kind of routine, gardening, sailing, going for a favourite bike ride, starting new projects, working on some self-improvement items (such as down-sizing, home improvements, reading, exercising, studying, or whatever).

Today, I made a list, but it has been brewing for the last couple of weeks, especially because I have been rather bored here, resting, in order to get rid of the flu which turned into bronchitis, so I can enjoy these last days of sun, ocean, and heat.

After leaving Guatemala, via Belize, I spent one day exploring Tulum (a small but beautiful Mayan ruins site by the ocean) and sitting under a palapa on the beach. Unfortunately, I remembered to use sunscreen everywhere but my face! Forgot to bring my hat too!

A coati and me at the Tulum ruins

Here in Cozumel for the last five days, waiting and hoping that my lungs clear up enough to go diving. Fortunately, I am staying in a lovely big Airbnb apartment not far from a bright, modern hospital where I have been going twice a day for nebulisation treatments. The grocery store is not far, and there is a great little place to eat fresh hot tacos al pastor right around the corner, so all my basic needs are covered.

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Catching the setting sun.

I also got a Mexican sim card for my phone, so I have unlimited calls anywhere in Mexico, USA, and Canada. These calls are refreshing after a steady diet of facebook and TV. A CBC app on my ipad is also a boon, and it makes appreciate, as I listen to the weather reports, the warmth (actually, I should say heat) of Mexico.

Hasta pronto,

Val

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Two Parks

Two parks up on the mountain sides

So far I have visited two parks up on the mountain sides. They are very different.

One is a conference centre in a park setting where artists are encouraged to install their art and visitors get free transportation up the steep mountainside to enjoy art, nature, and fine dining. It is owned by a hotel called Casa Santo Domingo which is here in Antigua. This hotel, built on the site of an old monastery is also a delight to explore. http://www.casasantodomingo.com.gt/default-en.html

 

Besides permanent art exhibits outside, there are art galleries and museums. The two most interesting were a museum to the Guatemalan author, “Miguel Ángel Asturias Rosales (October 19, 1899 – June 9, 1974) was a Nobel Prize-winning Guatemalan poet-diplomat, novelist, playwright and journalist. Asturias helped establish Latin American literature’s contribution to mainstream Western culture, and at the same time drew attention to the importance of indigenous cultures, especially those of his native Guatemala.” He was also a contemporary and friend of Pablo Neruda, the Chilean author and diplomat.” Wikipedia

And the other dedicated to Efraín Recinos (May 15, 1928 – October 2, 2011) who was a Guatemalan contemporary architect, muralist, urbanist, painter and sculptor. He thought art was best diplayed in a natual setting, so this park is a perfect match for him. Wikipedia again

The other park/garden is an organic garden that also has a great restaurant. It cost 10 quetzales to catch a little bus that ferries people up the mountain to the farm and back again. It is a very steep road with incredible hairpin turns. The gardens are planted on the mountain side and labelled quite well. We (my German friend, Christine and I) found a memorial to the founder, Frank Lee Mays Sirmons, of Cerro San Cristobal, of the textile store in Antigua, Nim Po’t, and  La Antigua Galeria de Arte. He died only last December in 2016, and from the pictures we saw there, he appeared to be a tall, long-haired, red-headed, hippy-looking man, well-loved by the people around him. He had lived in Guatemala for the last 25 years. The food was great and the view even better.

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So this is how I spend my time when I am not studying Spanish. Presently, I have a lovely tutor, a history teacher, who is getting me to read some very interesting articles about the recent history of Guatemala. My writing lags far behind, unfortunately. Here is a picture of us at her school where her students did some photography on various themes.

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Lovely Cozumel

Lovely Cozumel

Cozumel is a great island just off the Mayan Coast. It is especially noted for its wonderful diving. The town is small and safe, and the hotels are out of town which is just fine with me.

The reefs and beaches are on the on the east side facing the mainland and the west side has lovely deserted beaches because one cannot swim in the rough waters. When there is a north wind, it is rough everywhere.

To pass the time during my recovery from blocked middle ears, I rented a car and drove around the island spending a time sunning on the beach, and eating great ceviche in a restaurant perched on the highest point of the island while I studied for my exam on Enriched Air Diving.

Here are some pictures.dsc04391dsc04406dsc04410dsc04434

Small towns and beaches

 

Tuesday, November 22, 2016
Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico

In an interesting change of roles, I have been the guest of Frida, a young woman who was my guest many years ago when she was only ten. Frida came to Canada to practise her English: she went to summer camp with my daughter, she caught poison ivy, she travelled out west by car with us; she marvelled at the “snow” when we crossed the glaciers between Jasper and Banff.

This past weekend, it was I who rode in the back of the van to Manzanillo. Frida and her husband, Ricardo, stopped in Comala on the way to have breakfast. We found a charming place on a side street, overlooking a lush ravine, which served some delicious Mexican breakfast dishes: chilaquiles, sopes, frijoles, fresh juices, and café, of course.

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On the beach in Manzanillo and in Malaque, we snacked on fresh pineapple, jícama, cucumber, and shrimp all laced with chile and lemon. We drank green coconut water and beer in the shade of big parasols and cooled off in the beautiful waters of the Pacific.

On the way back to Guadalajara, we stopped in Sayula, a pretty town which specializes in making knives, cajeta (dulce de leche), sweet pastries and empanadas, and birria. It is also the birthplace of the author and photographer, Juan Rulfo (1917-1986).