Home soon

Travelling is great, but I always miss being home, and the closer the time to return home, the more I look forward to seeing family and friends, enjoying the comforts of home, getting back into some kind of routine, gardening, sailing, going for a favourite bike ride, starting new projects, working on some self-improvement items (such as down-sizing, home improvements, reading, exercising, studying, or whatever).

Today, I made a list, but it has been brewing for the last couple of weeks, especially because I have been rather bored here, resting, in order to get rid of the flu which turned into bronchitis, so I can enjoy these last days of sun, ocean, and heat.

After leaving Guatemala, via Belize, I spent one day exploring Tulum (a small but beautiful Mayan ruins site by the ocean) and sitting under a palapa on the beach. Unfortunately, I remembered to use sunscreen everywhere but my face! Forgot to bring my hat too!

A coati and me at the Tulum ruins

Here in Cozumel for the last five days, waiting and hoping that my lungs clear up enough to go diving. Fortunately, I am staying in a lovely big Airbnb apartment not far from a bright, modern hospital where I have been going twice a day for nebulisation treatments. The grocery store is not far, and there is a great little place to eat fresh hot tacos al pastor right around the corner, so all my basic needs are covered.

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Catching the setting sun.

I also got a Mexican sim card for my phone, so I have unlimited calls anywhere in Mexico, USA, and Canada. These calls are refreshing after a steady diet of facebook and TV. A CBC app on my ipad is also a boon, and it makes appreciate, as I listen to the weather reports, the warmth (actually, I should say heat) of Mexico.

Hasta pronto,

Val

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Last days in Guatemala


Last days in Guatemala

If you are going to be sick, better not to be on the road. I got a bad case of the flu in Antigua, and was glad to be “at home” where I could sleep all day, and make myself something to eat when I got hungry.
Unfortunately, I still felt rather weak leaving for Semuc Champey. It was a long ten hour bus trip. The countryside got more striking as we entered the department of Alta Verapaz. It is greener; the mountains are steep with breath-taking views from the narrow winding roads.

It was a bit of an effort, but I pretty well kept up the the young ones the next day on our tour. The caves were particularly challenging as we were in water, often over our heads most of the time. It was rather difficult to keep our candles lit! I found it scary coming back: we had to slide down the rocks in a water fall into a deep pool. Lost my cap in there!

Afterwards, we relaxed in tubes as we floated down the river. Needless to say, the cough didn’t gey any better that day.

Another ten hour bus ride to Flores which is in the northern most department of Petén. The next day: Tikal, the most important and largest of the Mayan ruins. We had a great guide who took care to choose the shadiest paths as it was mid-day with temperatures over 35 degrees. He was also a lover of nature and pointed out many birds and spider monkeys to us.

The second day, the sunrise tour was more agreeable with its cooler temperture and its abundance of wild life (even if we didn’t see the sunrise due to the cloud cover). Highlights: two scorpions on the trail, a Great Currasow (male), toucans, trogons, herons, flycatchers, and many more.

Today, I am veging in the pretty town of Flores as my tour of another site was cancelled. Tomorrow heading back to Mexico.

The Ruins of Copán (Honduras)

The ruins of Copán (Honduras)

It takes about seven hours to drive from Antigua to Copán in Honduras. Most of the road is a narrow highway with a passing lane in some areas, but it would have been useful the whole way as the road winds it way East-Northeast of Guatemala City in mountainous terrain. The ride is not for the faint of heart.

At this time of year, the dry season, which they call summer here, (Winter is during the rainy season from May to October.) the trees are mostly bare except in low lying areas.

We left at 4 am, and I sat in front with the driver of the van. The sunrise was spectacular; there were often clouds below us over the valleys.

Copán is a small, border town which is frequented for its beautiful Mayan ruins which are considered to be the oldest. Copán lasted through the reign of sixteen kings. It is also considered to be the most beautiful of all the ruins found in Mayan territory which includes the south of Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras and parts of El Salvador.

After checking in at a nice little hotel, I was picked up by the guide who took me by tuktuk to the ruins. We spent the afternoon walking around the many courtyards, and pyramids, and the ball court. The guide was knowledgeable as he had worked his whole life at the ruins, first with archeologists digging and tunneling their way into the past and then re-constructing much of it as the stalae, the pyramids, the carvings and most of the artifacts were either overgrown with trees, or broken and strewn about by the forces of nature and man.

The other nice aspect of the Copán ruins is the setting. It is like a park and in places like the jungle. The whole site is well looked after. Many Scarlet Macaw which have been bred in order to save them from extinction now live in freedom. They do not wander too far as feeding stations and nests are provided for them. There are also other forms of wildlife. I happened to see a snake and a pair of Central American Agouti which are large rodents. They are related to the guinea pig and are quiet and quite shy.

At the hotel, I asked the young woman at the desk how late a woman alone can walk on the streets of the town. She answered that any woman can walk on any street as late as she pleases. This was a surprise to me as I had heard that Honduras is a lawless place… but not in Copán, apparently.

At any rate, I went to bed soon after dinner since I was up since 3 am.

The next morning, I walked back to the ruins, about one kilometre, to visit the museum. It houses most of the original statues and carvings to protect them from the sun and rain. On the actual site, they have installed reproductions. The beauty and complexity of the works are mind-boggling.

Before leaving Guatemala, I hope to visit Tikal the biggest of all the Mayan ruins. It is said that if Tikal could be compared to New York, Copán would be Paris.